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Tom.
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   Posted 7/18/2006 3:48 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
The two supplements that I have recently done some modest research on are gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and melatonin. I have noted the references at the bottom with footnote numbers in the text.

First let me start with melatonin. I read from numerous sources, including LEF, that melatonin has many positive benefits. I myself have taken it on occasion to help with sleep. For me, it works wonders, and puts me into a deep sleep. I use the LEF time released melatonin. Upon research, I recently located a UC Berkley letter about a Japanese study which confirmed that melatonin switches on a recently discovered hormone called gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), which has the opposite effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). (1)

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) as you may already know, is is a hormone made by the hypothalamus which causes the pituitary gland to make luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Both hormones have direct effect on the growth and maturation of testosterone and sperm in males and eggs in females.

Since it is now demonstrated that melatonin inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which in turn inhibits luteinizing hormone (LH). I'm wondering if this mean taking melatonin would also down-regulate the production of testosterone and sperm in males, which in turn would have a negative effect on sex-drive, mood, muscle growth among other things? It seems conclusive based on the studies.

Second supplement is gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)

I have just recently started taking GABA to aid in stress reduction, sleep and to help with growth hormone release. Research demonstrates in one study that dietary GABA does increase the plasma concentration of growth hormone.(2)

However doing some other research I found side effects. Two conflicting studies. One which appears to prove that GABA inhibits firing of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons (3), and another study that indicates that GABA can excite (GnRH) neurons, (4). Another study also appears to prove that GABA inhibits erections (5), which perhaps would support the case for GABA as an inhibitor of (GnRH). It is proven that GABA plays an important role in the regulation of the GnRH neurons. (6), to what extent is still up for debate.

If GABA in fact does inhibit (GnRH), like melatonin, this is probably also conclusive that it would also have the same, possible side effects as melatonin, such as, down-regulating testosterone, sperm production and sex-drive and such.

What would be the side effects of such side effects? I have since stopped taking melatonin and GABA until more is clarified and known. My other comment is this; our bodies go through a natural process of birth and death to which it adjusts to these changes over time. It produces things when it needs it and stops when it doesn't. Do we really want to mess with that biological process by artificially up-regulating it or down-regulating it with chemicals?

In an effort to keep this thread on topic, does anyone have any sincere, researched comments to share about these supplements? Are there any doctors on this board that can help answer these two supplement questions?

REFERENCES
------------------------------------------------------

(1) UC Berkeley News Press Release: Popular supplement melatonin found to have broader effects in brain than once thought
http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2005/02/07_melatoninfin.shtml

(2) PubMed: Dietary gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects the brain protein synthesis rate in young rats.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16755368&query_hl=17&itool=pubmed_docsum

(3) PubMed: Immunocytochemical colocalization of GABA-B receptor subunits in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons of the sheep.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16713120&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum

(3) PubMed: Endogenous GABA release inhibits the firing of adult gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14617578&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_DocSum

(4) PubMed: Endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid can excite gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16123153&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum

(5) PubMed: Central control of penile erection: role of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16043278&query_hl=17&itool=pubmed_docsum

(6) Endocrinology Vol. 143, No. 4 1459-1466 Copyright © 2002
Effect of GABA on GnRH Neurons Switches from Depolarization to Hyperpolarization at Puberty in the Female Mouse
http://endo.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/143/4/1459

Post Edited By Moderator (DDye) : 7/18/2006 3:07:04 PM (GMT-4)

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13bells
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   Posted 12/31/2006 4:32 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I have been taking melatonin 3mg per night, since I was 35; I am 49 now.

I have also taken 25 mg of DHEA per day since I was 37.

I finally had blood and urine tests done, and to my surprise, I have low testosterone levels!

testosterone, random 8.2 nmol/L
testosterone, free 26.4 pmol/L

DHEAS 12.9 umol/L which is high

I think you may have provided the answer.

"Since it is now demonstrated that melatonin inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which in turn inhibits luteinizing hormone (LH). I'm wondering if this mean taking melatonin would also down-regulate the production of testosterone and sperm in males, which in turn would have a negative effect on sex-drive, mood, muscle growth among other things?"

My doctor has put me on testosterone cream now.

This is getting confusing.
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Tom.
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   Posted 1/22/2007 5:55 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
You might want to make sure you ask your doctor what type of testosterone test he did. Total testosterone is not the same as free testosterone. If I were you, contact LEF and ask them what the correct test is to determine the correct testosterone levels.

I have stopped taking GABA and melatonin until more research to their safety is concluded.
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triman
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   Posted 1/25/2007 10:47 AM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
The studies I've seen on melatonin that show the effects on testosterone you speak of have used extremely large doses of melatonin (like 0.5 mg/kg body weight); for me that would be like taking close to 40 mg daily. Not a good study for what most people use (i've never heard of anyone using more than maybe 10 mg daily); I rarely exceed 5 mg.
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Dr. K
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   Posted 1/29/2007 12:11 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Melatonin has long been known to have a tendency to reduce sex hormone levels. High dosages can stop ovulation.

The logic behind supplementation with melatonin is to get levels closer to optimal physiological levels since the pineal gland tends to atrophy with age and melatonin levels decline. It is pharmacological levels of melatonin that have long been known to reduce sex hormone levels, but can physiological levels? The answer appears to be yes. I have not reviewed the whole literature, but at least in bird studies, the answer is yes.

Stress will also wreck havoc with hormonal systems. If someone is using melatonin to avoid sleep deprivation – in the absence of hard data – it seems reasonable to assume that the negative effects of sleep deprivation are far greater than the negative effects of melatonin. Using physiological as opposed to pharmacological dosing of melatonin (maybe 300 mcg) is likely (a guess in the absence of hard data) to have more good than bad effects. Studies suggest that the lower dosage is more effective, though I have not found this to be true for me.

Supplementing with GABA seems to me to be more of a shot in the dark – there are more effective ways to reduce stress, but much more difficult than taking a pill. My bottles of GABA sit ready to expire, not because I have reason to suspect any danger, but because I consider it a pharmacological intervention. Pharmacological interventions need to be held to a higher standard. Improving on a billion years of evolution is not easy.

I would bet that psychological methods will positively alter hormone levels much more powerfully than GABA. We are talking meditation here. I personally just don’t do it even though Herbert Benson, the Harvard cardiologist, has spent a career powerfully documenting the powerful “relaxation response.” Yoga is easier to get myself to do and also very likely to be very helpful. Anyone spending time on this forum is likely to prefer a more verbal approach. I strongly recommend this web site. http://www.reflectivehappiness.com/  Moderator, please do not block this! The site was developed by the then President of the American Psychological Association for research purposes. You can use it for one month for free.

Biological systems are extremely complex. Few of our interventions are totally positive. One of the more disturbing examples is curcumin, found in the spice turmeric. It is surely a wonder spice. Read about it on the LEF website. However, it also has the nasty habit of reducing the chances of cell death in cancerous colon cells. I still put it in my daily blender drink, but knowing that I may be increasing my risk of colon cancer.

Unless we believe that God put plants on the earth for our benefit, how can we assume that any broad spectrum acting substance will have just positive effects.

W. Klein, Ph.D.
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Linmac
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   Posted 1/29/2007 12:35 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I have just started using both GABA (1/8th tsp) and Melatonin (3 mg) and finally I can sleep. I use to lie awake for hours. I do wake up feeling a bit groggy though. I am female 60 yrs postmenopause. I have tried to find out more information and respect the research that you are doing. I probably need some testosterone anyway as my libido is way down and hope these two sleeping aids don't also affect testosterone in females. It's horrid feeling, thinking and looking young but having these "aging" symtoms happening. Keep us posted. Thanks...
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pyroluria
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   Posted 2/7/2007 3:40 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
13bells said...
I have been taking melatonin 3mg per night, since I was 35; I am 49 now.

I have also taken 25 mg of DHEA per day since I was 37.

I finally had blood and urine tests done, and to my surprise, I have low testosterone levels!

testosterone, random 8.2 nmol/L
testosterone, free 26.4 pmol/L

DHEAS 12.9 umol/L which is high

I think you may have provided the answer.

"Since it is now demonstrated that melatonin inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which in turn inhibits luteinizing hormone (LH). I'm wondering if this mean taking melatonin would also down-regulate the production of testosterone and sperm in males, which in turn would have a negative effect on sex-drive, mood, muscle growth among other things?"

My doctor has put me on testosterone cream now.

This is getting confusing.
 
I disagree with your assumption about supplemental melatonin causing low testosterone levels.
 
Have you tried Zinc Status? You probably have a zinc deficiency which would explain both the low test. levels and your need to take melatonin. (The body must have sufficient zinc to make testosterone.) I have read that the body needs zinc to make melatonin. Zinc is great for sleep too.
 
My severe zinc dependency caused me all sorts of sleep related problems which were corrected pretty soon after supplementing zinc.
 
But Zinc Status, which is sold in most health food stores, is an inexpensive way to test your own zinc levels at home. I highly recommend that you buy this product because unfortunately most doctors don't use this product even though it works immediately and is so cost effective.
 
A zinc deficiency should be ruled out if testosterone levels are low.
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lad
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   Posted 4/11/2007 7:10 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Believe me, if there was even the remotest chance that melatonin could enhance the sex drive, it'd be the headline in every ad for it. So you can conclude that it probably does the exact opposite. Even the pitchmen can't make that square peg fit. (SAM-e, which can facilitate melatonin conversion, also seems to share this one lust-killing side-effect with many ADs.)
 
I read that the optimal, non-tolerance-building dosage is the originally researched amount - 0.3 mg. So, I only pour out 1/3rd of a 1 mg cap when using it. And to think how many others are slamming down 3-5-15 mg every night (and getting diminishing returns for it?).
 
OTOH, ashwagandha is known to be useful for sleep, rejuvenation, AND libido enhancement. Anecdotally, it's said to even improve it for those on ADs.
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Tom.
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   Posted 5/2/2007 10:30 AM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Dr. K.,

Thanks for that information.

Very interesting about curcumin. To that point - raw, cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cabbage have components that can block thyroid function. Steaming those vegetables deactivates that component. Traditional "pickling" methods, such as when cabbage is fermented to make sauerkraut also deactivates it. A person would probably have to eat high quantities of those vegetables to have a significant effect, but since learning that, I no longer eat those vegetables raw or juice them raw.

Also vitamin K found in green vegetables interferes with anticoagulant drugs such as warfarin / coumadin. It's ironic how things so good for us can also have negative side effects.

What's unsettling is that people are experimenting with supplements without doing any proper research. They read one positive article from a company selling the stuff and they start taking it.

Personal research is important when it comes to supplements and I believe moderation is the key for food.


"At the age of 18 I left the Standard American Diet (SAD) and sedentary lifestyle behind and began my journey into a new life of nutrition, fitness and life extension. Dedicated self study and personal experience for over 20 years, it has become a rewarding lifestyle and a passion. My personal goal is to continually learn and share my knowledge and experience whenever possible and to help others live healthy, strong, vital, disease-free lives."

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Burton159
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   Posted 5/7/2007 1:11 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Dr. K said...
Melatonin has long been known to have a tendency to reduce sex hormone levels. High dosages can stop ovulation.

The logic behind supplementation with melatonin is to get levels closer to optimal physiological levels since the pineal gland tends to atrophy with age and melatonin levels decline. It is pharmacological levels of melatonin that have long been known to reduce sex hormone levels, but can physiological levels? The answer appears to be yes. I have not reviewed the whole literature, but at least in bird studies, the answer is yes.

Stress will also wreck havoc with hormonal systems. If someone is using melatonin to avoid sleep deprivation – in the absence of hard data – it seems reasonable to assume that the negative effects of sleep deprivation are far greater than the negative effects of melatonin. Using physiological as opposed to pharmacological dosing of melatonin (maybe 300 mcg) is likely (a guess in the absence of hard data) to have more good than bad effects. Studies suggest that the lower dosage is more effective, though I have not found this to be true for me.

Supplementing with GABA seems to me to be more of a shot in the dark – there are more effective ways to reduce stress, but much more difficult than taking a pill. My bottles of GABA sit ready to expire, not because I have reason to suspect any danger, but because I consider it a pharmacological intervention. Pharmacological interventions need to be held to a higher standard. Improving on a billion years of evolution is not easy.

I would bet that psychological methods will positively alter hormone levels much more powerfully than GABA. We are talking meditation here. I personally just don’t do it even though Herbert Benson, the Harvard cardiologist, has spent a career powerfully documenting the powerful “relaxation response.” Yoga is easier to get myself to do and also very likely to be very helpful. Anyone spending time on this forum is likely to prefer a more verbal approach. I strongly recommend this web site. http://www.reflectivehappiness.com/  Moderator, please do not block this! The site was developed by the then President of the American Psychological Association for research purposes. You can use it for one month for free.

Biological systems are extremely complex. Few of our interventions are totally positive. One of the more disturbing examples is curcumin, found in the spice turmeric. It is surely a wonder spice. Read about it on the LEF website. However, it also has the nasty habit of reducing the chances of cell death in cancerous colon cells. I still put it in my daily blender drink, but knowing that I may be increasing my risk of colon cancer.

Unless we believe that God put plants on the earth for our benefit, how can we assume that any broad spectrum acting substance will have just positive effects.

W. Klein, Ph.D.
Dr K,
 
I take LE's Super Curcumin every day (2 caps), so obviously i was a little suprised about your comment regarding its effect on cancerous colon cells.
 
Could you point us to a study or any evidence of this?
 
Thanks
 
Damian.
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Burton159
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   Posted 5/10/2007 1:36 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Burton159 said...
Dr. K said...
Melatonin has long been known to have a tendency to reduce sex hormone levels. High dosages can stop ovulation.

The logic behind supplementation with melatonin is to get levels closer to optimal physiological levels since the pineal gland tends to atrophy with age and melatonin levels decline. It is pharmacological levels of melatonin that have long been known to reduce sex hormone levels, but can physiological levels? The answer appears to be yes. I have not reviewed the whole literature, but at least in bird studies, the answer is yes.

Stress will also wreck havoc with hormonal systems. If someone is using melatonin to avoid sleep deprivation – in the absence of hard data – it seems reasonable to assume that the negative effects of sleep deprivation are far greater than the negative effects of melatonin. Using physiological as opposed to pharmacological dosing of melatonin (maybe 300 mcg) is likely (a guess in the absence of hard data) to have more good than bad effects. Studies suggest that the lower dosage is more effective, though I have not found this to be true for me.

Supplementing with GABA seems to me to be more of a shot in the dark – there are more effective ways to reduce stress, but much more difficult than taking a pill. My bottles of GABA sit ready to expire, not because I have reason to suspect any danger, but because I consider it a pharmacological intervention. Pharmacological interventions need to be held to a higher standard. Improving on a billion years of evolution is not easy.

I would bet that psychological methods will positively alter hormone levels much more powerfully than GABA. We are talking meditation here. I personally just don’t do it even though Herbert Benson, the Harvard cardiologist, has spent a career powerfully documenting the powerful “relaxation response.” Yoga is easier to get myself to do and also very likely to be very helpful. Anyone spending time on this forum is likely to prefer a more verbal approach. I strongly recommend this web site. http://www.reflectivehappiness.com/  Moderator, please do not block this! The site was developed by the then President of the American Psychological Association for research purposes. You can use it for one month for free.

Biological systems are extremely complex. Few of our interventions are totally positive. One of the more disturbing examples is curcumin, found in the spice turmeric. It is surely a wonder spice. Read about it on the LEF website. However, it also has the nasty habit of reducing the chances of cell death in cancerous colon cells. I still put it in my daily blender drink, but knowing that I may be increasing my risk of colon cancer.

Unless we believe that God put plants on the earth for our benefit, how can we assume that any broad spectrum acting substance will have just positive effects.

W. Klein, Ph.D.
Dr K,
 
I take LE's Super Curcumin every day (2 caps), so obviously i was a little suprised about your comment regarding its effect on cancerous colon cells.
 
Could you point us to a study or any evidence of this?
 
Thanks
 
Damian.
Dr.K or MOD,
 
Can LE or anyone substantiate this claim that curcumin "...has the nasty habit of reducing the chances of cell death in cancerous colon cells."  ?
Im sure Im not the only one out there who's taking it and would like to know if there's any proof/findings showing this.
 
 

Post Edited (Burton159) : 5/11/2007 7:11:16 AM (GMT-4)

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Burton159
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   Posted 5/11/2007 1:07 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Bump....Mod??

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DDye
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   Posted 5/11/2007 1:08 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Am not aware of this.
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august
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   Posted 5/17/2007 6:17 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
My alternative doctor prescribes GABA for anxiety - says it works as well as valium wthout side effects.  He only uses it for anxiety.
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Paul Theodorescu
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   Posted 5/20/2007 7:51 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Just a few thoughts:
 
Aren't the studies showing a decrease in testosterone doses above 3mg/day?
 
Regardless of what supplements you're taking - testosterone should be maintained to healthy levels. I think this may be analogous to metformin reducing B12 levels; you should need to ensure ideal homocysteine levels.
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Tom.
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   Posted 5/20/2007 7:58 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Doctors are so busy these days. I think the average patient time is 7 min. They barely have enough time to talk with their patients let alone keep up with current research.
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Paul Theodorescu
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   Posted 5/22/2007 11:34 AM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Get an anti-aging doctor. :)
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Tom.
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   Posted 5/22/2007 5:52 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Yes, years ago I went to a doctor who was on the LEF board of advisors. He has been the only doctor who has ever taken the time to sit down with me and go over my blood test and explain it completely. You can have the best doctor in the world but even still most don't keep up with all the research. Each person has to be their own health advocate.
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LarryG
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   Posted 6/7/2007 11:51 AM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
All things in moderation. GABA in large amounts, say a teaspoon, usually produces a wierd feeling and a kind of itchy prickly skin. However, 1/4 t does not. As far as libido goes, maca increases libidio in men and women without increasing testosterone (LEF SEARCH: MACA). You'll need to use it daily for a couple of months to get the full effect.

Me: male, age 62. I have found the best way to increase testosterone as follows: first, inhibit aromatase, which converts testosterone into estrogen. (LEF SEARCH: AROMATASE). (Bulknutrition search: anti-aromatase). Second, free up bound testosterone by using avena. Third, increase testosterone, and I have had the best results with Tonghat Ali 1:50. However the best is the tongat imported directly from Sumatra Pasak Bumi in Indonesia as recommended by Dr. David Williams, and there are American suppliers. I bought mine on ebay. You might try a Google search on this herb.

For men, when you increase testosterone, I suggest you also take a 5-ar inhibitor. 5-ar converts testosterone into DHT, which causes prostate enlargement and baldness. (LEF SEARCH: 5-AR). Prescription meds work best, especially Avodart.

So, for me, 3mg of melatonin and 1/4 t GABA, plus the regimen above works well.
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Tom.
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   Posted 6/7/2007 2:41 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Just keep this in mind ...

When taking supplements people must be aware of and accept research that demonstrates contraindications. Ultimately the choice is left up to each individual.
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RED- No Source Talk # 2
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   Posted 6/7/2007 3:09 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Is this GABA you speak of like GHB or the precusor to GHB once swollowed? They used to sell it at GNC.... RED
Dr. K said...
Melatonin has long been known to have a tendency to reduce sex hormone levels. High dosages can stop ovulation.

The logic behind supplementation with melatonin is to get levels closer to optimal physiological levels since the pineal gland tends to atrophy with age and melatonin levels decline. It is pharmacological levels of melatonin that have long been known to reduce sex hormone levels, but can physiological levels? The answer appears to be yes. I have not reviewed the whole literature, but at least in bird studies, the answer is yes.

Stress will also wreck havoc with hormonal systems. If someone is using melatonin to avoid sleep deprivation – in the absence of hard data – it seems reasonable to assume that the negative effects of sleep deprivation are far greater than the negative effects of melatonin. Using physiological as opposed to pharmacological dosing of melatonin (maybe 300 mcg) is likely (a guess in the absence of hard data) to have more good than bad effects. Studies suggest that the lower dosage is more effective, though I have not found this to be true for me.

Supplementing with GABA seems to me to be more of a shot in the dark – there are more effective ways to reduce stress, but much more difficult than taking a pill. My bottles of GABA sit ready to expire, not because I have reason to suspect any danger, but because I consider it a pharmacological intervention. Pharmacological interventions need to be held to a higher standard. Improving on a billion years of evolution is not easy.

I would bet that psychological methods will positively alter hormone levels much more powerfully than GABA. We are talking meditation here. I personally just don’t do it even though Herbert Benson, the Harvard cardiologist, has spent a career powerfully documenting the powerful “relaxation response.” Yoga is easier to get myself to do and also very likely to be very helpful. Anyone spending time on this forum is likely to prefer a more verbal approach. I strongly recommend this web site. http://www.reflectivehappiness.com/  Moderator, please do not block this! The site was developed by the then President of the American Psychological Association for research purposes. You can use it for one month for free.

Biological systems are extremely complex. Few of our interventions are totally positive. One of the more disturbing examples is curcumin, found in the spice turmeric. It is surely a wonder spice. Read about it on the LEF website. However, it also has the nasty habit of reducing the chances of cell death in cancerous colon cells. I still put it in my daily blender drink, but knowing that I may be increasing my risk of colon cancer.

Unless we believe that God put plants on the earth for our benefit, how can we assume that any broad spectrum acting substance will have just positive effects.

W. Klein, Ph.D.
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yza
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   Posted 9/21/2007 7:14 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Info about Melatonin Side Effects
One of the least poisonous substances known is melatonin. The only side effects related with taking a large amount of melatonin are continued sleepiness and a slower reaction time. Many people are discouraged from taking melatonin.


Yza
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r2d2
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Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 37
 
   Posted 9/27/2007 2:41 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
   I have been taking 3mg melatonin time release for a few years now along with 37 mg Dhea. ( I take a 25mg and break it in half and take one half in the morning and a full 25mg at nite before bed). Testosterone way up, muscles much improved, sex drive thru the roof. I'm 58 . nuff said. nono
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rosel
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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 64
 
   Posted 10/9/2007 6:04 PM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
There is no official dosage range for melatonin supplements. Different people will be more sensitive or less sensitive to melatonin. For those especially sensitive to it, lower dosages may work as effectively as the standard amount, while taking the standard amount or higher dosage could cause anxiety and irritability.


 Pure Hoodia Gordonii

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hendrix_is_god
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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 6
 
   Posted 11/28/2007 11:40 AM (GMT -4)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I take melatonin almost every night and I take GABA ever morning to help with my anxiety problems. I'm 15 so I'm still maturing. Would me taking GABA and melatonin regularly affect my growth?
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